Blog Archives

The Book Revue

Ever since the birth of this blog, I’ve been dying to visit (for probably the billionth time in my life)  and feature The Book Revue in Huntington, New York because I dare say it is one of the most perfect, most precious bookstores in all of New York and it’s one that I continually return to like a little, lost, book-loving puppy finding it’s way back home.

That chair is calling your name.

Why is The Book Revue oh-so-great, you ask? Well, sit back and relax, because there are plenty of reasons that this bookstore will rock off your book socks and I’m prepared to share all of them.

First of all, on top of the fact that their supply of books is seemingly endless, their prices are so exceptional that you can easily purchase a large and hefty stack of books here and walk out the door after paying, sort of feeling like you still robbed the place. My favorite section of the store is the “Remainder” tables because here is where you’ll find piles and piles of classic literary gems marked down at 50-75% off. So that means, you’re getting unused paperbacks anywhere from about three to seven dollars. These discount tables are the main contributing component to the fact that I have more books than I actually know what to do with.

This may come as a shock to you, but I’m not a millionaire. I try to be somewhat frugal, (which is hard to do when it comes to books) but when I pay a visit to The Book Revue, it is extremely rare occurrence if I don’t leave with at least two new books in hand. But most times, it’s like five. Call it excessive, but when the books are this affordable it’s hard not to be glutinous. It’s so hard!

The next best part about The Book Revue, is the infinite amount of places for book-shoppers to sit scattered around the store. You’ll find a place for your bottom around almost every corner you turn. It’s perfect because when you’ve just found that book you’ve been dying to read for months and all you want to do is dig right into it, it’s almost like someone walks up right behind you with a chair at the very same moment and says, “Why here, have a seat.” Alright, obviously that doesn’t happen but I said, “almost,” it’s almost like that, OK? Plus, if you’re into the really quiet and cozy corners of bookstores, head up to The Book Revue’s second floor where there are a bunch of chairs and tables waiting for you on a balcony that overlooks the store. For those who wish to write and read quietly as they revel in a quaint, bookish atmosphere, this snug, secret little corner of the store could not be more ideal.

Buy all of the books!

Maybe you’re thinking all of this just sounds too good to be true, but just wait, because there’s more. Yes, this store gets better because they also have their very own cafe. So go ahead, grab a coffee, a cup of tea, or whatever the heck kind of little snack you want, browse through an excellent and endless selection of books, and once you’ve found your chosen text, sit back and relax for as long as you like because The Book Revue is usually open late. It’s very unlikely that you will ever overstay your welcome here.

Oh and by the way, while your schmoozing in your cozy chair with your latte and a great new book, keep your eyes open for any celebrity sightings because The Book Revue invites plenty of authors to their lovely, little store quite frequently. For example on November 16th, Mr. Regis Philbin will be visiting the store to speak about and sign his new book. Alright, if your not a retired Who Want’s to be a Millionaire fan and Kelly’s Sidekick doesn’t really do it for ya, some past guests have included the likes of Tim Gunn, Sammy Hagar, and Dick Van Dyke. I’m just saying, The Book Revue gets your books signed!

Community!

Conclusions

Is this a good place for reading or writing? Do you even have to ask? I mean, come on, really?

Bonus Points: The whole store. Everything about it gets all of the bonus points. (But one thing I didn’t mention: The fact that it has two Local and Independent Author Tables. Supporting local is where it’s at, y’all!)

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The People’s Libary at Occupy Wall Street

It doesn’t seem likely that the site of a large protest would be a suitable place for reading quietly. Which is why you might be surprised to find that Zuccotti park, home of the Occupy Wall Street protests, has its very own public library and that many protestors can be found with their noses buried in books, reading and occupying all at the same time.

Since the Library’s beginnings, its makeshift shelves have grown to house about 500 to 1,000 books. All of the books were donated and its neat organization is maintained by a handful of volunteers, one of which is Steven Grant, a former Marine from New Orleans.

According to its wishlist, the library is currently in need of scissors, markers, books, cameras, and laptops. If you would like to donate books and supplies to The People’s Library, you can mail them to

Mail:
The UPS Store
Re: Occupy Wall Street
Attn: The People’s Library
118A Fulton St. #205
New York, NY 10038

You can follow the progress of the Occupy Movement and the library by visiting the library’s blog here. You can also read more about my experience at Zuccotti Park on Saturday here.

Conclusions

Is this a good place to read or write in public? Believe it or not, yes! Many readers can be found scattered around Zuccotti park. And while many people are protesting on the outskirts of the square, the inside of the camp is relatively quiet and peaceful. Even more so, for every protestor propped up against a tree or sitting on the steps with a book, you’ll find another with a pen and notebook, or even a laptop, diligently writing the day away.

Bonus points: Donated books free for anyone to borrow and the biggest sense of community I’ve seen in a really long time.

Website // Facebook // Flickr

Bookstore lovers, has an occupy movement started in or near your city? If so, does it have its own library?

Blogging from: Idle Time & Tryst

No one told me that parking my car in D.C. would give me severe anxiety. It’s not because of the traffic or anything like that. It’s because none of the Pay to Park stations work! I had finally found a legal curbside parking space, only to find that I wasn’t really able to make it “legal” because of stupid failed technology’s inability to allow me to pay for it. Seriously, people. It’s almost 2012. We have robots in space  and iPads! I don’t think a working Pay to Park Station is too much to ask for. You’d think our nation’s capitol would be much more efficient, right? HA!

For this reason, today’s “Blogging From” post is a combination recap of my time at  Idle Time Books and Tryst, all of which was spent playing the game of, “How Long Can I Last Before I Break Into a Serious Sweat Wondering Weather or Not I’ve Received a Parking Ticket I Can’t Afford for Something Completely Out of My Control.”

Pretty books!

Thankfully, Idle Time and Tryst are located only a few doors down from one another. I was headed to Tryst because reader Mike Ridley so kindly recommended it as one of his favorite “work in public” D.C. establishments. It was originally my one and only destination, where I was planning to sit and stay a while. But as I made my way up the street, a bright green storefront came into view and there was absolutely no question as to whether or not I was going to go in.

It looks so dreamy!

Idle Time; what an ironic store name given my time-limited situation. I really had no “idle time,” but I stepped inside and gave the store a quick browse. It was a pretty standard used book store. You won’t find every single book here but they have a hearty selection of classic literature, non-fiction, science, history, and a few other categories too. They also have a miniature vinyl record section, which is something that for me, will always set any store apart from others. Books and music man. Books and music.

I ventured upstairs where plenty of signs had indicated I would find even more books. And more books I found. A small and simple quirk that added that little extra something to the store was the books that were lined along the stairs. The types of books a store chooses to feature in this kind of fashion give the store character. Judging by their staircase books, I’d pin Idle Time’s character as classically diverse. And of course all things classic are essentially good.

All stairs of the world need books.

The second floor was warm and inviting thanks to it’s large windows and the sunshine shining through. With a few chairs scattered here and there, the store certainly invites its shoppers to pop a squat and read for a while. Unfortunately I had not been granted the luxury of doing so.

Motto: No corporate coffee, no matching silverware.

As for Tryst, I’m a little disappointed that I didn’t get to spend some quality time with my laptop there. Although, I don’t know that even if I had had the time I would have been able to, because man, the place was packed. There was not one empty table that I could see. Almost everyone there was either working on a laptop or buried in a book with a highlighter in their hand. Clearly, Tryst is a D.C. Student “work in public” hot-spot. It was a bit loud in there though. I’m not sure if I would be able to concentrate on writing surrounded by so many chatty “studiers.”

Because of my anxiety-induced time limit, I walked up to the to-go counter and ordered a Strawberry Banana Pineapple smoothie. So all I can tell you about Tryst is that it’s crowded on Saturdays, they’ve got some kick-butt artwork on their walls (I spied Dirty Harry), they have decent smoothies, and oh, really good looking men work there. At least three different handsome baristas assisted me with my order and they only made me wish that I could have stayed a while.

Conclusions

Are these good places for reading and writing?

Idle Time: I could see myself getting lost in books pulled from their shelves for hours at time. (That is when I have the time. *Rolls eyes at city of D.C.*) So yes. But it’s not so much a “write in public” place.

Tryst: Yes. Not that I would really know, but everyone else there seemed to be getting some kind of work done.

Bonus Points: Tryst and Idle Time are neighbors on 18th St NW in D.C.’s cutesy Adams Morgan neighborhood. They are like bookstore and coffee shop best friends!

Idle Time on Facebook

Tryst’s Website // Tryst on Facebook  // Tryst on Twitter

Blogging From: Politics and Prose

Also, Pretty & Purple.

There’s nothing like a big, bright bookstore to brighten up a rainy day. It’s dark and gloomy outside in D.C. today, but I knew that dreary, rainy-day feeling would vanish once I stepped inside Politics and Prose. I could tell that it was going to be a bookstore  well worth my trip into D.C. before even stepping inside. I think it was the big purple awning hanging over the store front that gave it away. It was either that or the name.

According to their website, the store opened twenty five years ago and the owners chose the name wanting to represent the D.C. area without being “pretentious.” I can understand not wanting to seem pretentious. Pretentious people are generally not enjoyable or friendly or fun. But bookstores, I think bookstores should be allowed to be a little bit pretentious. You know? They are bookstores. They provide the public with books and books are important. We need books. So if anything in this world could get away with being pretentious, it should be a bookstore. They never are though, which speaks a lot to bookstore’s personalities. They’re probably the only existing entity that could rightfully get away with being a teensy bit smug and proud, and yet they choose not to.

Community!

So, speaking of being unpretentious, Politics and Prose is friendly and welcoming and it offers an excellent stock of carefully selected books to its customers, just the way a good bookstore should. It’s neatly organized into easy to find sections and there’s something for every type of reader. When I first walked into the store I first stumbled into a table of books dedicated to books on current politics. How fitting. To the left side of the store I found the “New and Recommended” shelf, which features the current top ten bet sellers and a handpicked display of new and notable literature.

Politics and Prose is, without a doubt, a “Blogging from Bookstores” kind of place. They have plenty of chairs strewn all across the store that invite shoppers to take a seat and read for a bit. This idea is basically even a part of their business model. On their website they write:

“We see the store as a fun place to be, to shop, and to work in. We chat with customers. We urge them to sit down and look at books before they make a decision.”

So basically, it’s perfect. Perfect for book shopping. Perfect for reading. Perfect for writing and working. It seems like it couldn’t be any more perfect, right? Wrong. What really takes this bookstore to the next level is it’s Modern Times Cafe. It’s located in the store’s basement and is well equipped with plenty of tables and chairs, free WiFi, and of course, coffee and food! The menus are written in chalk on chalk boards in classic cafe style  and everyone here is either working on their laptop, reading a book, or engaged in a deep conversation with friends.

Underground, so indie!

When I entered Modern Times, it was packed. It didn’t look like there was one seat open, yet I still ordered my Iced Tea to stay because I was determined to find somewhere to set up camp with my laptop. I spotted a space where two older women were seated and noticed an open chair next to them. “Is anyone sitting here?” I asked. “Just my books,” one of the women responded as she smiled at me and moved her pile of newly purchased books to the floor. She cleared the space and I thanked her as I snagged the last available spot in this Bookstore Cafe Heaven. As I’m writing, I just overheard one of the baristas say to a customer, “Yeah, everybody’s doing double trips today.” I don’t blame them. If I lived closer to Politics & Prose and their Modern Times Cafe, there’s a good chance I’d make it here at least three times a day. Hell, who am I kidding, I’d just live here.

Is this a good place for reading and writing? I believe I have already made that clear, but just to reiterate, YES! YES! YES! Come here and bring your books (or better, buy some from them!) and your laptop and read and write away!

Bonus Points: A built in cafe, a kick-ass name, and noteworthy contributions to the local community by hosting tons of educational events and supporting local book clubs! Other highlights also include, fairly priced books, a cheap cafe menu (my iced tea was only $2!), an extremely knowledgeable staff, and a fantasy land kids section complete with a beanbag nook! (See slideshow for photos!)

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Website // Facebook // Twitter

Blogging From: Busboys & Poets

What: Coffee Shop/ Restaurant/ Mini-bookstore

Where: Arlington, VA

Ring the bell, sound the alarm! We have a winner! OK, I guess this was never really meant to be a contest, but Busboys and Poets  definitely wins the prize for being the best establishment I have found so far that meets all of the things that I look for when I’m on the hunt for the perfect places conducive to reading and writing in public. Busboys and Poets is an independently owned restaurant and cafe that now has four different locations all around the DC Metro area. It was founded in 2005  by Anas “Andy” Shallal, an Iraqi-American artist, activist, and restaurateur, with the intentions of creating a “community gathering place.” He named the establishment for Langston Hughes, who once worked as a busboy at the Wardman Park Hotel prior to gaining recognition as a poet.

Before entering Busboys and Poets, I was expecting it to be a little more bookstore and a little less cafe. However, it happens to be much more of a cafe and restaurant than it is a bookstore. This was not a disappointing turn of events, though. The atmosphere inside was busy and buzzing. If the tables full of people that I noticed in the outside dining area prior to entering weren’t enough of an indication that this was an Arlington hotspot, then the amount of people I found inside certainly was. Customers have the choice of either being seated to a booth, pulling a stool up to the bar, or plopping down at one of the communal tables where you’re welcome to dine, work, write, and read to your heart’s desire.

A picture of my blog, on my blog. So meta.

I set up camp at one of the large communal tables, which was empty when I arrived but eventually became home to other laptop toting, cafe-lovers who came to B&P to get some work done. I’m the kind of person who takes an agonizingly long amount of time to decide on what I’m going to order whenever I’m out to eat, but when a restaurant has a menu as diverse and appetizing as Busboys & Poets’, it will take me three times as long. When I finally decided on what to order, I chose the Harira, which is a flavorful Moroccan bean soup, and it did not disappoint. The cool thing about B&P’s menu is that it has a lot of options to offer and it also specifically points out which dishes are vegetarian, vegan, and gluten free. Their menu also boasts the following:

  • 100% Fair Trade & organic coffees and teas.
  • Organic wine and beer. And Biodynamic wine.
  • Boycotting of Canada’s seal hunt by “no longer purchasing any seafood from Canada.”
  • Primarily sustainable seafood.
  • Grass-fed, free range beef from local Virginia farms.
  • Local, organic field greens from the Engaged Community Offshoots Farm Network.
  • Conservation of water by only serving it upon request.

Show the planet some love.

Aside from providing good food and a great place to work, Busboys & Poets also supports local artists, musicians, and activists by hosting tons of different events like open mic poetry nights, independent film screenings, author readings and book signings, and talent showcases. You’ll also find several paintings by local artists available for purchase decorating many of the B&P walls.

Some art & trinkets in the bookshop section.

The books section of B&P is not what a true bookstore lover would call a “bookstore.” It’s more of a gift-shop-like area where you’ll find some pretty cool gizmos and gadgets that are actually worth buying. Of course, for all intents and purposes you can rightfully call it a bookstore since there were four or five shelves filled with a good deal of really great reads.

I spy Howard Zinn.

Conclusions

Is this a good place for reading or writing? 100% yes. This place was made for people like me who tote their laptops and books around with them everywhere they go. This is the type of place that public Internet users live for. Good food, good service, and good books. There’s not much more you can ask for.

Bonus points: Busboys and Poets is a proud member of DC Local First and are a Certified B Corporation. Also, their Hyattsville, MD location will be holding a very special event on Wednesday, September 21 (which is International Peace Day) where they will be dedicating a room to Howard Zinn. Check it out if you’re in the area!

Website // Facebook // Twitter

Blogging From: Hole in the Wall Books

What: Independent Book and Comic Book Store

Where: Falls Church, VA

Bookstores with creative names, are always the best kinds of bookstores. What bookstore lover wouldn’t want to step inside of a store called Hole in the Wall Books, right? It’s funny because I think most people might shy away from any other type of establishment named after an idiom that sometimes has a bit of a negative connotation. But a bookstore with this name; it sounds like it will lead you right into a scene straight out of Alice in Wonderland! It leaves an impression that makes you feel like once you step though the door, you’ll be transported, through a hole in the wall, to a magical land of books. For the most part this is true. Minus the part about going through a hole in the wall.

Hole in the Wall Books, which turned 33 years old this year, opened in 1979. The store started out as a record shop, and half of the store was converted into a bookshop shortly after opening. After a few years in business, the record store portion of the store was eliminated and ever since it has been a thriving independent bookstore which specializes in used books and comics.

Excellent custom decorations!

The comic book aspect of Hole in the Wall Books is definitely its claim to fame. I spoke with the store’s owner, Edie, (who by the way, was extremely helpful and friendly) and she told me that in 1989 the store was one of the first and original sellers of Diamond Comics, which is now the largest North American comic book distributor. “The comic books help a lot,” she said. “I don’t think we would be able to stay open without them.” Unfortunately, that’s only a sign of the times. Today, independently owned bookstores need a distinguishing feature that will keep readers coming back. Lucky for Hole in the Wall, they’ve got that extra something that sets them apart.

Come here if you want comics.

While I’m no comic book fanatic, I could certainly tell that the store’s selection was extensive. The literature fanatic in me can happily say that the same goes for their book collection. The inside of the store is cozy. It’s a relatively small space with plenty of hidden corners and crevices, all filled with more and more books. Books are organized into sections including literature, mysteries, non-fiction, and cooking, just to name a few.

Books galore!

Hole in the Wall Books is another search-and-revel-in-the-loveliness-of-bookstore-browsing kind of bookstore. There’s no sitting area for reading or writing, which I’ve recently come to realize is a much more modern bookstore aspect. Of all the bookstores that I’ve visited so far, the trend seems to reveal that the more contemporary shops like Kramer Books or Borders (RIP) are more commonly set up for customers who want to come in a pop a squat with a book or their laptop for an hour or so. Most older bookstores that have been around for some time don’t tend to have this feature as often. Even though I’m always looking for a place where I can sit down and read or write, there’s no question that the older, more traditional bookstores will always have my heart. I hope they never go away.

However, one thing that is common to most older bookstores, that gives them character and spunk, is the decorations that are collected through the years. Hole in the Wall Books is very uniquely decorated. Much of the store is covered in comic book art and old newspaper articles.

Spiderman watches book browsers from the ceiling.

If you have the time to really browse, you’ll find some great gems at Hole in the Wall. For example, I shuffled through a few piles of books stacked on the floor and found a really cool Bob Dylan Scrapbook.

Bob salutes you.

I'm not sure how I resisted buying this.

The only reason this was not purchased is because I’m trying to be conscious of the amount of large, heavy books I collect. I’m moving back to New York in a few weeks and as I have learned from hauling my book collection around from place to place, books are heavy and not at all fun to pack and move. I did pick up a used copy of Oscar Wilde’s, The Picture of Dorian Gray, which is significantly smaller and lighter.

Conclusions

Is this a good place for reading or writing? Nope, this is not that kind of store. Although it is definitely quiet enough for reading. So, by all means, you could certainly pull a book from the shelf and plant your butt on the floor if you felt like reading a chapter or two!

Bonus Points: Good prices, creative name, lasting power, and an excellent domain name. (Holeintheweb.com, love it!)

Celebrating International Literacy Day

If bookstores had a favorite holiday, it would be today, and that’s because today is International Literacy Day.

Instead of blogging about a bookstore or coffee shop today, (and by “instead of” I mean: Because the three day weekend totally threw me off and I didn’t make it to a second bookstore this week) I’m going to share some facts and figures about literacy around the world from the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

  • This year’s International Literacy Day theme is Peace (As noted on the poster above.)
  • In 2008, about 796 million adults were unable to read and write, which means that about one in six adults is still not literate.
  • Of those 796 million, 64% were women.
  • “The adult literacy rate increased by about 8 percentage points globally over the past 20 years – an increase of 6% for men and 10% for women.”
  • In 2008, for the majority of countries surveyed, youth (ages 15-24) literacy rates were greater than adult literacy rates.
  • Still, “131 million youth worldwide lacked basic reading and writing skills,” that same year.

Whether it be in a book, on the Internet, or just a text message from a friend, most of us read everyday. Along with the ability to write,  it’s something that most of us had the privilege of learning at a very young age and is a skill that is easily taken for granted. It’s easy to forget that not everyone should be so fortunate. Let today not only be  a reminder for us to be thankful for our own reading and writing abilities, but also a means of spreading awareness about world literacy rates with the intention of continuing to increase the amount of people who have the ability to read and write globally.

“Once you learn to read, you will be forever free.”- Frederick Douglas

[All statistics and figures found in UNESCO’s Literacy Fact Sheet]

 

Blogging From: Kramer Books & Afterwards Cafe

What: Independent Bookstore, Cafe, & Bar

Where: Dupont Circle, Washington D.C.

GPOYSF: Gratuitous Picture of Your Storefront

Non-native DCers, who dare to enter the complicated traffic patterns of Dupont Circle often become lost and end up wandering around  the loop for some time before finding their way out. Fortunately, I didn’t have to take to the circle with my car (lord only knows I’d still be driving around it), but thanks to Kramer Books, I did get to wander and circle around quite a few bookshelves.

I don’t live in D.C., so I didn’t know, but Kramer Books is sort of  the place to be if you’re anybody who’s anybody residing in the city known as our nation’s capitol. And with good reason too. Not only is it a fully functioning bookstore with a hearty selection of books, it also houses a bar and a cafe. Books, food, and drinks. There’s not much else you need in life, so once you step inside Kramer Books, you’re pretty much good to go.

The most books.

The most food & drinks.

While some have recently suggested that the good old paper and ink book is on the decline, others support that the so called “death of books” is a huge exaggeration.  Judging by the amount of people (mostly twenty-somethings) that were shopping at Kramer Books during the middle of the day on a Saturday, I’m going to go ahead and confidently stand by the latter declaration. The store was crowded and people were buying books, lots of books.

As I browsed through the piles of contemporary literature I overheard a shopper recommended Jonathan Safran Foer’s Everything is Illuminated to his friend. “It’s really funny because the main character’s grandfather doesn’t understand or speak English very well. But it gets pretty serious at the end. I liked it,” he told her. When I asked a store employee where Hunter Thompson’s books could be found, I was impressed by his knowledge of their exact location.  “Second case to the left, on the second shelf from the floor,” he said. I asked specifically about The Rum Diary. He even knew what color the book’s spine was. These little novelties,  browsing with and recommending books to friends and the expert knowledge of bookstore employees are not things that book lovers are willing to let go of and because of that, small independent bookstores like this one will continue to survive, even as e-readers gain popularity.

And drink.

Another distinct detail, that is typical of many bookstores but always unique and appreciated, was the employee recommendation note cards. It’s always fun to get inside the heads of a bookstore’s employees and see what they’re reading and recommending. This is another example of an in-store novelty that technology and e-readers can’t replace. (Or at least they haven’t yet.)

Thanks, Gus!

Although the store owners have certainly turned Kramer Books into a popular hangout spot, I didn’t notice any chairs or areas that invited shoppers to pop a squat and start a book or open up their computers to hop onto the Internet. This doesn’t take away from the store, though. Some bookstores are better suited for seating areas, but Kramer Books is more of a browse and shop type store. They have a good thing going on.

As far as the food and drink aspect of the store go, most would expect that a cafe attached to a bookstore would be the type of cafe populated by patrons lounging around with their laptops. But the Kramer Books cafe is more of a full fledged restaurant. You’ll sit down and order a real meal that will be delivered to you by a waiter or waitress. You’re not going to come here to eat a muffin while you write your latest blog post or finish up those last pages of your book. That’s cool though, because its a different sort of bookstore business model and it’s working for them. I didn’t sit down to eat at Kramer Books, and it’s a little silly to judge food by the way it looks, but going by some of the pictures on their Facebook page, I’m going to guess their menu is pretty delicious.

Conclusions

Is this a good place for reading or writing? No. This is a popular bookstore that is often busy and crowded (not too crowded, though) and it wasn’t set up with the intention of having customers come in to read or write within the vicinity. That’s not to say you  shouldn’t come here, though. Because you should. You should and you better.

Bonus points: Food & drinks and an excellent selection of contemporary literature. This store knows what books people are looking for and puts them at the forefront.

Website // Facebook

Blogging From: Dolce Coffee

What: Locally owned Coffee Shop/ Cafe

Where: East Market Street, Leesburg, Virginia

Sweet coffee.

Although renamed Dolce Cofee in the real word, if you type this coffee house’s address into Google, you’ll find that it was previously called “Greenberry’s.” Social Media Management people! Someone tell the owner of this place that they need to up their game when it comes to the their online presence. Just kidding! Does it really matter? Probably, not. Plus, I’m not here to judge their marketing strategies. Although, I guess I just did. Anyway…

When it was good ol’ Greenberry’s, this place was a franchise. During that time another blogger called it a  “local Starbucks wannabe.” I don’t know what it was like before now, but I’m going to guess that it’s at least made a little bit of an improvement from being a chain coffee shop. It’s not the greatest or cutest or nicest place in the world, but I don’t see it as a Starbuck’s wannabe, which to me, would be worse than being an actual Starbucks.

The first thing that I noticed about Dolce Coffee, before I even walked through the door, was the window display to the left of the entrance, which promotes the coffee shop’s weekly, Friday night Open Mic nights. Any establishment that fosters a weekly open mic is good in my book!

Support the all of the arts!

As I walked through the doors and toward the counter, I almost tripped on a huge bump in the floor, which I later found out from a sign placed oh-so-kindly on the front counter, is from water damage. The most annoying part about it is not that I did an awkward ooo-I-almost-just-tripped-but-I’m-going-to-pretend-that-no-one-saw-that dance, it’s that the girl behind the counter was waiting for it to happen. You know she just stands there all day waiting to laugh hysterically to herself over the unsuspecting customers who instantly become victims of the large bump in the floor. I know I would.

Thanks for the cone.

I ordered their Chicken Salad sandwich on wheat bread, which I can only say was an extremely disappointing excuse for chicken salad. It lacked any sort of taste and what little taste it did have was not enjoyable or chicken-like at all. Luckily, I also ordered a strawberry banana smoothie, which met and passed my extremely high smoothie standards. Although, it was no Shoes, Cup, and Cork Club Smoothie. But what can ya do? Not all smoothies can be the best smoothies, right?

Of course, now I am blogging and I do have to say that the environment here is very blogger friendly. Myself included, four people in this here coffee shop are currently situated behind Internet machines. The older man directly across the room from me looks like he’s reading the stock markets on his MacBook Pro. I say that because he’s bald, except for a few white hairs clinging for life on either side of his head, he’s wearing a white collared shirt, a tie, khaki dress pants, and suspenders, and just generally looks like an intensely stressed investment banker who just flew from Wallstreet to Leesburg in his private helicopter so that he could enjoy a diet coke at his favorite hometown coffee shop. Whatever, it could be true. Or maybe he’s just playing Farmville.

Another man who is across the room to my right is typing up a storm on his old-school IBM laptop. He look way too cool for a Mac. IBM all the way for him. From the looks of what little he has left of his greying hair, I’d say he’s middle-aged. He has a happy camper vibe going on. He is wearing a maroon T-shirt, dark brown cargo shorts, and hiking boots. He has sunglasses propped on  the top of his head and looks just a little bit too happy to be here. He probably just came home from a long, relaxing, technology free camping trip in the woods and is just so ecstatic to finally be reconnected with his beloved Internet. Either that or he just really likes his frappuccino and is telling everyone on Twitter how much so.

There is a decorative tree blocking my view of the third coffee shop laptop-user present here and so I will never know who he is or what he’s doing here. There is another man sitting on one of the stools that are lined up along the counter facing the window and I can’t tell if he has a Bluetooth device in one of his ears or if he’s talking to himself. Either way, why do you gotta do that here, man?

Oh and let’s not forget me. I’m also here. Little old me sitting in my big green comfy chair, blogging away about all of the people in the coffee shop. Am I totally creeping, or what?

Can you see the investment banker there in the corner?

I was also able to get some quality reading time in here. I’m currently feasting my brain upon L.M. Montgomery’s Anne of Green Gables, which is a total delight of a book that I would most certainly suggest to all lovers of young adult whimsy who have not yet read it.

Oh, Anne.

Conclusions

Is this a good place to reading or writing? Sure. It’s quiet and they’ve got barely audible indie music playing in the background. You’ll find it easy to concentrate here. (Unless you’re me and have a terrible habit of watching, judging, and making up stories about people.) Also, they’ve got WiFi so you can write and publish all in one stop. What a concept!

Bonus Points: Random pictures of Audrey Hepburn that have nothing to do with anything else int he entire shop. I’ll take it.

Breakfast at...Dolce's?

Blogging From: Reston’s Used Book Shop

What: The second oldest business and only independently owned, bookstore in Reston, Virginia.

Where: Reston, Virginia (Duh, I just said that.)

BRB, moving into the apartment above the store.

It’s the weekend of Hurricane Irene and today I went out and braved the storm in search of Reston’s Used Book Shop. Just kidding, it was only raining a tiny bit when I made the trip, but the store is located along the lovely Lake Anne and it definitely felt like a storm was brewing as I walked along the waterside.

Enough about the weather, though. What we’re here to talk about is the bookstore, and the bookstore we shall talk about! Reston’s Used Book shop is everything that the quintessential, cozy, cute book store should be and then some. Upon walking inside, I was immediately greeted by an antique-like china closet turned bookcase, filled with rare collectible books. The store has a classic, vintage-y vibe that triggered my old soul senses right away.  It’s a cute little maze of tall, towering bookcases, all filled to the brink, with books of course.

Pretty, pretty books.

I browsed around for a good hour or so, searching up and down for all of my favorite authors. This isn’t the biggest bookstore, but for their modest size, they have a fun, diverse selection of reading material. There are chairs alongside a good majority of the shelves, so that if you find something really good you can plop your bottom right down without even really having to think and dive right in. Excellent.

Part of being a really great used bookstore is having reasonable prices, which is not something that Reston’s Used Book Shop has overlooked. Their paperback books are all half off of the original price and their hardcovers are individually priced, but I don’t think I opened one that was more than $10. (Don’t quote me on that though, because I only opened a few hardcovers. I’m a total paperback girl, OK?!)

Lots of books for little moolah.

Aside from the stellar prices, the thing I love most about Reston’s Used Book Shop next is their signage. All of it is very DIY and consistent throughout, giving the shop it’s own unique character. Each categorical section had it’s own creatively designed sign, making it all the more apparent that a lot of passion went into creating the distinct aesthetic of the store.

DIY! Yeah!

The second room of the store, which one of the store employees told me they had expanded into about 15 years ago, (the store has been open for 33 years) houses a hearty children’s section, as well as a nice collection of art books, classic collectibles, and books on a few other various topics. This room has a cozy little seating area that’s sort of reminiscent of your grandma’s living room. And just to be clear, I say that with a positive connotation attached to the living rooms of grandmas in my mind. I find grandma’s living rooms to be generally favorable places.

Maybe it's the rocking chair. Rocking chairs are grandma-y.

There’s no Wifi here so you won’t  sit down and do any Interneting, but even with several other shoppers in the store, it was peacefully quiet so it’s a great atmosphere to sit down and delve into a book for a while. Also, I think there’s something to be said about the fact that there were several other shoppers in the store despite the fact that little, old Hurricane Irene was on her way. The people want their books!  At one point I talked to another woman who was scouring the shelves so diligently, that at first I thought she was an employee. She told me that she was from out of town but that her daughter lived in the area and her and her husband visit the store whenever they’re in town. “You love it that much, huh?” I said to her. “Oh yes, I love my books,” she said. Right on.

Here are a few more quirky, book-ish things I found around the store:

Cat nap on the dictionary.

A tea pot of books.

Epic bookmark collage.

Hello there, Mr. Twain.

Mmmm, old books.

Conclusions

Is this a good place for reading or writing? Certainly! There was no WiFi as far as my computer was concerned , but there’s ample seating and plenty of peace and quiet. They’ve accurately captured the bookstore-esque atmosphere here.

Bonus Points: Advocating of independent bookstores, supporting the local economy, and embracing uniqueness. (See sign below.)

AKA, you are awesome for shopping here.

It says, you have just: “Kept money in the local economy, embraced our uniqueness, created local jobs, helped the environment, nurtured community, conserved tax dollars, created more choices, took advantage of our expertise, invested in entrepreneurship, and made us a destination.” All true and all good.

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