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The Book Revue

Ever since the birth of this blog, I’ve been dying to visit (for probably the billionth time in my life)  and feature The Book Revue in Huntington, New York because I dare say it is one of the most perfect, most precious bookstores in all of New York and it’s one that I continually return to like a little, lost, book-loving puppy finding it’s way back home.

That chair is calling your name.

Why is The Book Revue oh-so-great, you ask? Well, sit back and relax, because there are plenty of reasons that this bookstore will rock off your book socks and I’m prepared to share all of them.

First of all, on top of the fact that their supply of books is seemingly endless, their prices are so exceptional that you can easily purchase a large and hefty stack of books here and walk out the door after paying, sort of feeling like you still robbed the place. My favorite section of the store is the “Remainder” tables because here is where you’ll find piles and piles of classic literary gems marked down at 50-75% off. So that means, you’re getting unused paperbacks anywhere from about three to seven dollars. These discount tables are the main contributing component to the fact that I have more books than I actually know what to do with.

This may come as a shock to you, but I’m not a millionaire. I try to be somewhat frugal, (which is hard to do when it comes to books) but when I pay a visit to The Book Revue, it is extremely rare occurrence if I don’t leave with at least two new books in hand. But most times, it’s like five. Call it excessive, but when the books are this affordable it’s hard not to be glutinous. It’s so hard!

The next best part about The Book Revue, is the infinite amount of places for book-shoppers to sit scattered around the store. You’ll find a place for your bottom around almost every corner you turn. It’s perfect because when you’ve just found that book you’ve been dying to read for months and all you want to do is dig right into it, it’s almost like someone walks up right behind you with a chair at the very same moment and says, “Why here, have a seat.” Alright, obviously that doesn’t happen but I said, “almost,” it’s almost like that, OK? Plus, if you’re into the really quiet and cozy corners of bookstores, head up to The Book Revue’s second floor where there are a bunch of chairs and tables waiting for you on a balcony that overlooks the store. For those who wish to write and read quietly as they revel in a quaint, bookish atmosphere, this snug, secret little corner of the store could not be more ideal.

Buy all of the books!

Maybe you’re thinking all of this just sounds too good to be true, but just wait, because there’s more. Yes, this store gets better because they also have their very own cafe. So go ahead, grab a coffee, a cup of tea, or whatever the heck kind of little snack you want, browse through an excellent and endless selection of books, and once you’ve found your chosen text, sit back and relax for as long as you like because The Book Revue is usually open late. It’s very unlikely that you will ever overstay your welcome here.

Oh and by the way, while your schmoozing in your cozy chair with your latte and a great new book, keep your eyes open for any celebrity sightings because The Book Revue invites plenty of authors to their lovely, little store quite frequently. For example on November 16th, Mr. Regis Philbin will be visiting the store to speak about and sign his new book. Alright, if your not a retired Who Want’s to be a Millionaire fan and Kelly’s Sidekick doesn’t really do it for ya, some past guests have included the likes of Tim Gunn, Sammy Hagar, and Dick Van Dyke. I’m just saying, The Book Revue gets your books signed!

Community!

Conclusions

Is this a good place for reading or writing? Do you even have to ask? I mean, come on, really?

Bonus Points: The whole store. Everything about it gets all of the bonus points. (But one thing I didn’t mention: The fact that it has two Local and Independent Author Tables. Supporting local is where it’s at, y’all!)

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Blogging From: Fresh & Organic

Much unlike my horrid experience, at Caribou Coffee on Monday, my time spent at Fresh & Organic in Ashburn was pleasant and enjoyable. A quiet little cafe tucked away in one of Northern Virginia’s many shopping strips, Fresh & Organic is the a perfectly quaint, locally owned cafe fit for even the most health-conscious, good-food-loving individual.

Organic & Fresh

Admittedly, Fresh & Organic doesn’t necessarily fall directly  into the typical bookish Coffee Shop/ Cafe standard that I’m constantly on the look out for, but honestly, Northern Virginia is sort of lacking in that area. I had debated on whether or not I wanted to spend my last weekend here making yet another trek into D.C., but after recalling my previous frustrations with parking on The Hill, I decided to hunt for something more local. I knew there had to be at least one more suitable place in good old Ashburn. So when I came across Fresh & Organic, I figured as long as they serve coffee (which, they do) they’re good enough for my blog.

When I walked inside I was greeted by a very friendly gentleman, the owner of the shop, who handed me a menu and told me to let him know when I was ready to order. There were two other customers already seated, both of which the owner was on a first name basis with; the first indication that Fresh & Organic would be worth my while. I eventually ordered the Black Bean Burger and then sat down at a table and read while I waited for my food. In stark contrast to the atmosphere at a much more detestable coffee shop earlier in the week, Fresh & Organic proved to have an impeccable taste in music, quietly sharing tunes via a My Morning Jacket Pandora Station. Beck, Led Zeppelin, Wilco? Why yes, sharing this good music with your customers at a reasonable volume is an excellent decision.

Mmmm!

In addition to serving up good music, I can also attest to the fact that Fresh & Organic serves good food. My Black Bean Burger and the organic salad that it came with were both delicious. This was one of the best meals that I have eaten out in a really long time, which I think goes to show that fresh, natural, unprocessed food is the way to go. As I was leaving, the owner said that he hoped I would come back. I told him that I was moving to New York at the end of the week but that I liked my burger and his little cafe so much that I would try to make it back for one more Fresh & Organic meal before my departure.

Conclusions

Is this place good for reading or writing? Most definitely. The environment is relaxed and quiet. Plus there’s good music and good food. It’s a done deal.

Bonus Points: From Fresh & Organic’s Website: “Our recipes combine healthy ingredients in order to provide you with the utmost in taste and nutritional value. We are organic wherever possible and always fresh!…We ardently believe that nature’s simple ingredients are enough… and you won’t need to be a biochemist to pronounce them!” Right on!

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P.S. Get ready to explore New York’s bookstores & Cafe’s! Next time you hear from me, I’ll be blogging from The Big Apple.

Blogging From: Caribou Coffee

What: Coffee Shop Franchise

Where: Ashburn, VA

I’m not trying to be mean- really, I’m not a mean person- but I’ve been here for all of five minutes and I hate this place. It’s a total wannabe indie cafe and it’s trying way too hard. I should have known this would be a subpar coffee shop when I asked what was in the White Peach Berry Smoothie and the cashier told me she didn’t know because it was pre-made. I mean, sure, it tastes pretty good but god only knows what’s in it. I’m going to guess a lot of fake sugar because no real fruit is this sweet. “Fruit” smoothie my butt. Don’t call it what it’s not, Caribou Coffee.

There’s free wi-fi here and besides myself, there are a bunch of other people working on laptops, but I’m honestly wondering if they are having the same amount of trouble concentrating as I am because the crappy music in here is so loud I can barely hear myself think. The song playing right now sort of sounds like an extremely mediocre version of Jack Johnson that should just never be played at all, let alone at the excruciatingly painful volume they have it blasting.

This place makes Starbucks look appealing.

Since I’m on a total complaining roll right now, I’ll take this opportunity to point out the obnoxiously loud employees conversing about why their is toilet paper near the coffee grinder. One of the baristas just asked another, “Why is their toilet paper over here?”

“I don’t know,” the other replied to her.

Maybe it’s because this place is crap. I think you should take the toilet paper as a sign.

It’s going to sound like I came here just to secretly listen in on all of the Caribou Coffee employees’ conversations, but since we’re on the subject and they are talking so loudly that it would be impossible for me to not hear them let’s recap another excruciatingly embarrassing conversation that just took place:

Employee one: Hufflepuff? What’s Hufflepuff?

Employee two: Ew, don’t talk to me about Hufflepuff. I don’t even like Hufflepuff.

Employee one: I don’t even know what Hufflepuff is.

Employee two: Hufflepuff is like…happy people. I’m a Gryffindor.

Excuse me, but first of all, happy people? Happy people? What is that even supposed to mean? Have you even read Harry Potter? Clearly you have not. The essence of The Hufflepuff House goes much beyond your vapid description. Second of all, according to Pottermore, I’m a Hufflepuff and you have greatly offended me, you ignorant Harry Potter Fool. Hmph!

There’s not much else for me to say about Caribou Coffee. I could certainly point out plenty of other shortcomings but I’d rather not since I can’t wait to finishing writing this and get the hell out of here. Nice knowing you, Caribou Coffee. NOT!

Is this a good place for reading or writing? If you bring earplugs.

Minus Points: Inability to spell.

Come again?

Blogging from: Idle Time & Tryst

No one told me that parking my car in D.C. would give me severe anxiety. It’s not because of the traffic or anything like that. It’s because none of the Pay to Park stations work! I had finally found a legal curbside parking space, only to find that I wasn’t really able to make it “legal” because of stupid failed technology’s inability to allow me to pay for it. Seriously, people. It’s almost 2012. We have robots in space  and iPads! I don’t think a working Pay to Park Station is too much to ask for. You’d think our nation’s capitol would be much more efficient, right? HA!

For this reason, today’s “Blogging From” post is a combination recap of my time at  Idle Time Books and Tryst, all of which was spent playing the game of, “How Long Can I Last Before I Break Into a Serious Sweat Wondering Weather or Not I’ve Received a Parking Ticket I Can’t Afford for Something Completely Out of My Control.”

Pretty books!

Thankfully, Idle Time and Tryst are located only a few doors down from one another. I was headed to Tryst because reader Mike Ridley so kindly recommended it as one of his favorite “work in public” D.C. establishments. It was originally my one and only destination, where I was planning to sit and stay a while. But as I made my way up the street, a bright green storefront came into view and there was absolutely no question as to whether or not I was going to go in.

It looks so dreamy!

Idle Time; what an ironic store name given my time-limited situation. I really had no “idle time,” but I stepped inside and gave the store a quick browse. It was a pretty standard used book store. You won’t find every single book here but they have a hearty selection of classic literature, non-fiction, science, history, and a few other categories too. They also have a miniature vinyl record section, which is something that for me, will always set any store apart from others. Books and music man. Books and music.

I ventured upstairs where plenty of signs had indicated I would find even more books. And more books I found. A small and simple quirk that added that little extra something to the store was the books that were lined along the stairs. The types of books a store chooses to feature in this kind of fashion give the store character. Judging by their staircase books, I’d pin Idle Time’s character as classically diverse. And of course all things classic are essentially good.

All stairs of the world need books.

The second floor was warm and inviting thanks to it’s large windows and the sunshine shining through. With a few chairs scattered here and there, the store certainly invites its shoppers to pop a squat and read for a while. Unfortunately I had not been granted the luxury of doing so.

Motto: No corporate coffee, no matching silverware.

As for Tryst, I’m a little disappointed that I didn’t get to spend some quality time with my laptop there. Although, I don’t know that even if I had had the time I would have been able to, because man, the place was packed. There was not one empty table that I could see. Almost everyone there was either working on a laptop or buried in a book with a highlighter in their hand. Clearly, Tryst is a D.C. Student “work in public” hot-spot. It was a bit loud in there though. I’m not sure if I would be able to concentrate on writing surrounded by so many chatty “studiers.”

Because of my anxiety-induced time limit, I walked up to the to-go counter and ordered a Strawberry Banana Pineapple smoothie. So all I can tell you about Tryst is that it’s crowded on Saturdays, they’ve got some kick-butt artwork on their walls (I spied Dirty Harry), they have decent smoothies, and oh, really good looking men work there. At least three different handsome baristas assisted me with my order and they only made me wish that I could have stayed a while.

Conclusions

Are these good places for reading and writing?

Idle Time: I could see myself getting lost in books pulled from their shelves for hours at time. (That is when I have the time. *Rolls eyes at city of D.C.*) So yes. But it’s not so much a “write in public” place.

Tryst: Yes. Not that I would really know, but everyone else there seemed to be getting some kind of work done.

Bonus Points: Tryst and Idle Time are neighbors on 18th St NW in D.C.’s cutesy Adams Morgan neighborhood. They are like bookstore and coffee shop best friends!

Idle Time on Facebook

Tryst’s Website // Tryst on Facebook  // Tryst on Twitter

Blogging From: Kramer Books & Afterwards Cafe

What: Independent Bookstore, Cafe, & Bar

Where: Dupont Circle, Washington D.C.

GPOYSF: Gratuitous Picture of Your Storefront

Non-native DCers, who dare to enter the complicated traffic patterns of Dupont Circle often become lost and end up wandering around  the loop for some time before finding their way out. Fortunately, I didn’t have to take to the circle with my car (lord only knows I’d still be driving around it), but thanks to Kramer Books, I did get to wander and circle around quite a few bookshelves.

I don’t live in D.C., so I didn’t know, but Kramer Books is sort of  the place to be if you’re anybody who’s anybody residing in the city known as our nation’s capitol. And with good reason too. Not only is it a fully functioning bookstore with a hearty selection of books, it also houses a bar and a cafe. Books, food, and drinks. There’s not much else you need in life, so once you step inside Kramer Books, you’re pretty much good to go.

The most books.

The most food & drinks.

While some have recently suggested that the good old paper and ink book is on the decline, others support that the so called “death of books” is a huge exaggeration.  Judging by the amount of people (mostly twenty-somethings) that were shopping at Kramer Books during the middle of the day on a Saturday, I’m going to go ahead and confidently stand by the latter declaration. The store was crowded and people were buying books, lots of books.

As I browsed through the piles of contemporary literature I overheard a shopper recommended Jonathan Safran Foer’s Everything is Illuminated to his friend. “It’s really funny because the main character’s grandfather doesn’t understand or speak English very well. But it gets pretty serious at the end. I liked it,” he told her. When I asked a store employee where Hunter Thompson’s books could be found, I was impressed by his knowledge of their exact location.  “Second case to the left, on the second shelf from the floor,” he said. I asked specifically about The Rum Diary. He even knew what color the book’s spine was. These little novelties,  browsing with and recommending books to friends and the expert knowledge of bookstore employees are not things that book lovers are willing to let go of and because of that, small independent bookstores like this one will continue to survive, even as e-readers gain popularity.

And drink.

Another distinct detail, that is typical of many bookstores but always unique and appreciated, was the employee recommendation note cards. It’s always fun to get inside the heads of a bookstore’s employees and see what they’re reading and recommending. This is another example of an in-store novelty that technology and e-readers can’t replace. (Or at least they haven’t yet.)

Thanks, Gus!

Although the store owners have certainly turned Kramer Books into a popular hangout spot, I didn’t notice any chairs or areas that invited shoppers to pop a squat and start a book or open up their computers to hop onto the Internet. This doesn’t take away from the store, though. Some bookstores are better suited for seating areas, but Kramer Books is more of a browse and shop type store. They have a good thing going on.

As far as the food and drink aspect of the store go, most would expect that a cafe attached to a bookstore would be the type of cafe populated by patrons lounging around with their laptops. But the Kramer Books cafe is more of a full fledged restaurant. You’ll sit down and order a real meal that will be delivered to you by a waiter or waitress. You’re not going to come here to eat a muffin while you write your latest blog post or finish up those last pages of your book. That’s cool though, because its a different sort of bookstore business model and it’s working for them. I didn’t sit down to eat at Kramer Books, and it’s a little silly to judge food by the way it looks, but going by some of the pictures on their Facebook page, I’m going to guess their menu is pretty delicious.

Conclusions

Is this a good place for reading or writing? No. This is a popular bookstore that is often busy and crowded (not too crowded, though) and it wasn’t set up with the intention of having customers come in to read or write within the vicinity. That’s not to say you  shouldn’t come here, though. Because you should. You should and you better.

Bonus points: Food & drinks and an excellent selection of contemporary literature. This store knows what books people are looking for and puts them at the forefront.

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